The Power of Dad

When I was cleaning yesterday, Harold caught my eye.



Harold’s been sitting on my husband’s dresser for

……years 

It’s in the spot where he keeps his 

important things”

a sacred place I don’t disturb but once-a-hardly-ever

“Dad can fix anything”



Echoed in my mind as I dusted around Harold as he perched among 

the important things.


Harold’s probably been there from about the time this picture was taken. 


It was just yesterday.


Oh, wait, Harold’s playmate is now 12.


I guess he’s been there for more like


at least five years.




Poor Harold.
I’m thinking he probably won’t get fixed 
real soon. 
But he’s safe.  He’s among 

The Important Things.



I was struck at how many things have sat on my husband’s dresser because

Dad can fix anything.



My children say this rather matter-of-factly because “duh, mom, dad’s invincible.” 

He can fix anything.



Now, I know really he can’t.   But he’s always seemed to fix, at least temporarily, just about anything the kids have brought to him over the years that’s been broken. 

 Tractor wheels, 
rockets,
 basketball hoops,
 Barbie cars, 
Star Wars figures, 
and Harolds.  



Time must have gone pretty quickly after Harold arrived among 

the important things 

because our youngest forgot about him.  He probably transitioned from Thomas the Tank Engine to Star Wars.  Kindergarten was probably the age, moving from little boy stuff to the serious stuff.


And here Harold still sits.
But his presence isn’t forgotten 
It’s a testimony to the Power of Dad
Not just Yoder dad, but every dad.

In the eyes of children, DAD is a hero whether they want to be or not.
Dads wear an invisible cape seen only to their children

As a counselor, I often hear kids say
“I don’t have a dad.”

What they’re really saying is, 

“My dad isn’t part of my world.”  

He’s absent, not present, or even known.

But kids still yearn for his presence.
Because in their eyes, Dad‘s presence,
or lack of it
 is immeasurably powerful,

As our kids have gotten older, 
I still hear 
Dad can fix it”

I’ve been tempted to tell our older-and-wiser children
 he really can’t, 
Because the toys now are things that move 
like cars  and electronics

But I hesitate, 
knowing their hero with the cape 
will at least attempt to fix it
 he may or not succeed.  
But the process itself is powerful


 To his kids, it says
Somehow,
dad will take care of me.

And if what’s broken isn’t fixed, 
the example itself
Will find its way among 
The Important Things 
in life.


just like Harold.


P.S.  My daughter, our firstborn, posted this about her dad on facebook.  
Just a reminder of the influence of the invisible cape.

“Before his downfall a man’s heart is proud, but humility comes before honor.”


 Proverbs 18:12
“My dad is the most humble and hardworking man I know.”


There’s a superman in your house, too.









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4 thoughts on “The Power of Dad

  1. Joan Davis

    Yes, as kids it seems that Daddy can fix anything! Mine was always a hero in my eyes! Now my heavenly Father is the fixer of things…He always has a plan and His plan is always good! Blessings, Joan

  2. Denise

    This brings back many memories of my Daddy; oh how he used to "fix" things! Ha! My Mother and I would just shake our heads… He was (and always will be) the hero in my life. :)Blessings Brenda,Denise

  3. Kim

    Love this…just yesterday Hannah said the same things when she brought a broken "something" upstairs. I'm gonna give it to dad – cause he can fix anything! He's even the one that she goes to when she is hurt – those heroes in a cape just make things feel better too! Hooray for Dads!

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